Mango Hot Sauce
HOT SAUCE MANGOES! BUMBYE!

Mango Adoboloco Hawaiian Hot Sauce
massaman curry sa bai thai portland mangoes bumbye
Pono Farms Fine Meats Shreadded Pork Cheessteak with sliced Jalapeno and Adoboloco Mango Habanero Hot Sauce
Adoboloco Mango Habanero Hot Sauce - Mangoes! Bumbye!

HOT SAUCE MANGOES! BUMBYE!

(6 customer reviews)
4.83 out of 5 based on 6 customer ratings

MANGOES! BUMBYE! – in Pidgin English means “Mangoes Later”. The first thing you’ll taste is the perfect sweet flavor of a ripe mango, then the balance of Habanero heat and flavor. Adoboloco mango hot sauce is perfectly paired with pizza, hot sticky rice, pork chops, smoked pulled pork sliders, braised beef tacos or pretty much any taco for that matter. Also very good on a hot pastrami or Ruben sandwich. Perfect drizzled over Chevre, to eat with crackers.

05 FL OZ 148 mL

In stock

Minimum Price: $4.00

Mangoes! Bumbye! is the best thing to happen to pizza… Since pizza!

~ Xander

You’re here: Mango Hot Sauce

Mangoes! Bumbye! Adoboloco Mango Hot Sauce is made with sweet perfectly ripe mango and Habanero peppers. The sweet mango

Ingredients: Mango // Rice Vinegar // Garlic // Sea Salt // Habanero Peppers

Serving Suggestions for Mango Hot Sauce:

  • PIZZA
  • KALUA PIG / HAWAIIAN SMOKED PULLED PORK
  • FISH TACOS
  • CHICKEN WINGS
  • BURRITOS
  • BREAKFAST HAM & EGG SANDWICH
  • EGGS AT BREAKFAST
  • ON STEAMED BEETS
  • MIXED IN CRANBERRY SAUCE
  • CHEVRE / AKA Goat Cheese
  • POURED OVER HOT STICKY RICE
  • COCKTAILS

Mango Hot Sauce Video Review:

Origin of Mango varieties in Hawaii:

Mangoes (Mangifera indica) are widely grown as a home garden fruit in the warmer, drier areas of all major islands of Hawaii. The fruit is mostly consumed fresh as a breakfast or dessert fruit. Small quantities are also processed into mango seed preserves, pickles, chutney, smoothies, ice cream and now hot sauce.

The exact date of the first introduction of mangoes into Hawaii is not known. In attempting trace the date of introduction, a number different lines of evidence and interpretations encountered. The first documented date introduction appears to be 1824, when Meek of the brig Kamehameha brought small mango plants from Manila. These were divided between Don Marin, a horticulturist in Honolulu, and Reverend Goodrich, a missionary in Wailuku, Maui.

According to the published diary of Bloxam, a midshipman aboard the HMS. a British Navy frigate, three small mango were brought to Honolulu from Valparaiso, on this ship in 1825. These trees were planted presumably survived. Bloxam’s diary also a list of some of the economic plants growing in Hawaii prior to 1825, which did include mango. Although both the 1824 and dates seem well documented, some have stated that mangoes were introduced Hawaii before 1824. Dr. Willis T. Pope stated mangoes were probably imported from Mexico Don Marin sometime between 1800 and 1824. has not been possible to provide more information or a specific date relating to presumed earlier introduction. however, in an unpublished manuscript, mentioned 1824 as the probable date of the first introduction of mano plants into Hawaii.

Another report of an early introduction is found in an updated publication by John Cook. In this account of historical events of the times, Cook stated that the first mango tree planted in the territory was growing in Kalihi on the property of Captain Alexander Adams. Captain Adams is said to have grown this tree from seed he obtained on a trading vessel from South China which he visited in Honolulu harbor.

From these accounts, it appears that mangoes were introduced into Hawaii sometime before 1825, probably from several different sources. Before 1899, when S. W. Damon of introduced several grafted trees of varieties, most mango trees in Hawaii seedlings of the poly-embryonic type referred to as “Hawaiian” mangoes. These also called ‘Manini’ mangoes, after the name to the horticulturist Don Marin by Hawaiians. Because these seedlings apparently came several different sources, individual trees of the “Hawaiian” mangoes often differ in tree characteristics as well as fruit form, shape, and flavor.

Excerpt Source: Origin and classification of Mango varieties in Hawaii – R.A. Hamilton, Emeritus Professor, Dept. of Horticulture CTHAR

 

 

Weight .85 lbs
Dimensions 2 x 2 x 7 in

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